asapscience
sixpenceee:

The Tesseract is a fourth dimensional cube. As you may know, the 1st dimension is a line, the 2nd dimension adds width to the line (square) , and the 3rd dimension adds depth (cube). The 4th dimension is impossible for us to imagine because we live in a 3D world, but mathematically it exists.  In his theory of special relativity, Einstein called the fourth dimension time, but noted that time is inseparable from space.
Imagine how confusing a drawing of a cube would look like to someone who lives in a 2D world and has never experienced a 3D world. To them it would be overlapping squares. That’s exactly how we perceive the 4th dimension. We don’t understand how it looks but we can represent it on a 3D world. 
If anyone is interested here are some cool articles on this topic. (Can our brains perceive the 4th dimension?) (The 4th Dimension) 

sixpenceee:

The Tesseract is a fourth dimensional cube. As you may know, the 1st dimension is a line, the 2nd dimension adds width to the line (square) , and the 3rd dimension adds depth (cube). The 4th dimension is impossible for us to imagine because we live in a 3D world, but mathematically it exists.  In his theory of special relativity, Einstein called the fourth dimension time, but noted that time is inseparable from space.

Imagine how confusing a drawing of a cube would look like to someone who lives in a 2D world and has never experienced a 3D world. To them it would be overlapping squares. That’s exactly how we perceive the 4th dimension. We don’t understand how it looks but we can represent it on a 3D world. 

If anyone is interested here are some cool articles on this topic. (Can our brains perceive the 4th dimension?) (The 4th Dimension) 

ohstarstuff
ohstarstuff:

Spanning 4,000 light-years across, NGC 206 is the richest star cloud in M31 as well as one of the largest and brightest star formation regions of the Local Group. Also known as Andromeda, M31 is a spiral galaxy just 2.5 million light-years away. NGC 206 is near top center in this gorgeous close-up of the southwestern extent of Andromeda’s disk. The bright, blue stars of NGC 206 indicate its youth. In fact, its youngest massive stars are less than 10 million years old. 

ohstarstuff:

Spanning 4,000 light-years across, NGC 206 is the richest star cloud in M31 as well as one of the largest and brightest star formation regions of the Local Group. Also known as Andromeda, M31 is a spiral galaxy just 2.5 million light-years away. NGC 206 is near top center in this gorgeous close-up of the southwestern extent of Andromeda’s disk. The bright, blue stars of NGC 206 indicate its youth. In fact, its youngest massive stars are less than 10 million years old. 

photojojo

photojojo:

How do you capture incredibly minute details on the surface of a plant? Well all you really need is a scanning electron microscope.

Matsuura Tomoya gathered dying plants in his neighborhood and captured these black and white photos with a powerful S.E.M. Though they seem huge, the plant sections below are only 3mm wide!

Using an Electron Microscope To Photograph Dying Plants

via National Geographic

enuier
Last year, in total, British police officers actually fired their weapons three times. The number of people fatally shot was zero. In 2012 the figure was just one. Even after adjusting for the smaller size of Britain’s population, British citizens are around 100 times less likely to be shot by a police officer than Americans. Between 2010 and 2014 the police force of one small American city, Albuquerque in New Mexico, shot and killed 23 civilians; seven times more than the number of Brits killed by all of England and Wales’s 43 forces during the same period.

The explanation for this gap is simple. In Britain, guns are rare. Only specialist firearms officers carry them; and criminals rarely have access to them. The last time a British police officer was killed by a firearm on duty was in 2012, in a brutal case in Manchester. The annual number of murders by shooting is typically less than 50. Police shootings are enormously controversial. The shooting of Mark Duggan, a known gangster, which in 2011 started riots across London, led to a fiercely debated inquest. Last month, a police officer was charged with murder over a shooting in 2005. The reputation of the Metropolitan Police’s armed officers is still barely recovering from the fatal shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, an innocent Brazilian, in the wake of the 7/7 terrorist bombings in London.

In America, by contrast, it is hardly surprising that cops resort to their weapons more frequently. In 2013, 30 cops were shot and killed—just a fraction of the 9,000 or so murders using guns that happen each year. Add to that a hyper-militarised police culture and a deep history of racial strife and you have the reason why so many civilians are shot by police officers. Unless America can either reduce its colossal gun ownership rates or fix its deep social problems, shootings of civilians by police—justified or not—seem sure to continue.
escett

crossconnectmag:

The Mind-Bending Architectural Illusions of Markus Studtmann

A fine art photographer based in Berlin, Markus Studtmann has carved out a stylish niche for himself: architectural illusions. In his work he takes apart the foundations of his subjects to find their true meaning, before re-building them up again into eye-catching new shapes. Via Illusion

Cross Connect Mag // Facebook - Flickr - Twitter